Innovation

Improving Canada’s SR&ED Program for Startups

Today, during Ontario’s Civic Holiday, I finally got around to filling out Deloitte Technology Fast 50™ CEO Survey. There was an interesting question that sparked a thread that I’ve been thinking about lately:

“Specifically, do you think the SR&ED tax credit program is pretty good as is, or needs improvement? If it needs big changes, what would be the first change you would make?”

For those of you who don’t know what the SR&ED program is, go learn more because it can save your business tons of cash over time and help you finance your business with non-dilutive government assistance.

For those of you running (or have previously run) early-stage stage startups, here are my thoughts: Currently SR&ED will refund a portion of a startup’s R&D costs based on expenses incurred during the previous year – some of those earliest expenses claimed were incurred 18 months prior to the claim. For startups, this is an eternity. Today, startups can grow and die violently before they get their first SR&ED claim, which could have helped them to pay one more employee, solve one more problem or help one more customer.

The Canadian government should consider modifying the SR&ED program to include a faster-reimbursement timeframe for startups (making less than $1,000,000 in revenue per year). For example, this could mean making claims quarterly and being reimbursed within 60-90 days – this would massively improve startup financing in the short-term. A modification, as requested, would help startups build value and growth potential more quickly and help the overall competitiveness of the Canadian technology sector.

Will anyone help to stand behind an initiative to get the Canadian government to improve the SR&ED program for startups? Join the conversation in the comments below.

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Migrating Life to the iPad

As a first-generation iPad skeptic myself. I have been quickly converted to the opposite side within 1.5 days of tinkering, downloading apps and discovering how the iPad can change my life.

Initially, I thought that I should wait for the second-generation iPad, which would likely contain forward and backward facing cameras, a faster processor, more RAM, better resolution, 4G network support (WiMax, LTE), etc… needless to say, I’m not too upset that I made the switch earlier than originally anticipated.

The ultimate use cases include the ability to connect to all my cloud-based documents, spreadsheets and presentations using documents-to-go premium (connects to Google Docs, Dropbox, MobileMe and other services) and to have a form factor that allows me to easily read RSS feeds (using Feeddler) and quickly clip news stories to Twitter, Facebook, email and Evernote. It also doubles as a good mobile blogging client (writing this post from Wordpress for iPad).

Speaking of Evernote, I have also recently made the switch to clip and tag various elements of my life through its MacOS, Windows7, Google Chrome (browser extensions), iPhone and iPad apps — awesome!

Some essential news apps include Bloomberg, WSJ, NY Times, AP and Globe2Go (if you subscribe). For weather, get Accuweather Cirrus.

One disappointment was that I couldn’t download and register with Netflix, which I wanted to use for streaming movies and TV shows; Netflix, if you’re listening, please come to Canada soon!

I’ve included screenshots of my first 2 pages of apps for your complete review and you’ll notice that a few legacy apps from the iPhone have still made it to my list including Skype, which allows me to easily call anyone using Skype-out minutes (bonus: connect via Bluetooth handset for a very phone-like experience.


Page 1


Page 2

So, what am I still missing?

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TEDxToronto 2010 Coming Soon

This year I got involved with TEDxToronto2010, an independently organized TED event held in the great city of Toronto. If you’ve never seen a TED event, go watch a few talks online. You’ll be inspired.

The theme for Toronto’s 2nd annual TEDx conference is “A Call to Action”. We, the organizers, want to see real change come out of the event. We want speakers to challenge attendees and we want attendees to challenge themselves and each other. A Call to Action is our challenge to everyone who comes across TEDxToronto to be passionate, excited and driven to make positive change happen.

So far, we’ve got an extremely good lineup of inspirational speakers who are doing magnificent things. The line-up (so far) includes:

My role in this event is to help drum-up some sponsorship activity. After all, what company or organization doesn’t want to be affiliated with thought leadership, passionate and driven individuals and folks that change the world?

We are currently seeking sponsors for the following categories:

  • Innovation Sponsor: $10,000+
  • Inspiration Sponsor: $6,000+
  • Conversation Sponsor: $4,000+
  • After-Party Sponsor: $2,000+

Most companies and organizations choose to sponsor TED events because they want to leverage ideas, technologies, design, and education to help create a better future; because they will be investing in the creation of a community who believe in the power of ideas worth spreading; and because they believe in bringing together corporations and individuals who want to be change agents surrounding remarkable thinking and ideas.

Please contact me or leave a comment below with your contact details if you’re interested in sponsoring this year’s TEDxToronto event. I’ll make myself available to answer any questions, concerns or comments that you have and make sure that your organization gets the spotlight it deserves at the conference!

More info @ TEDxToronto 2010 Announcement

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Choosing Product Features

Today I came across the question of how to best choose product features throughout the course of development of a product.

Of course, there are several approaches that you can take to figure this out. In fact, I’d love to hear feedback from others below. At the onset of determining your feature set, it helps to have a good understanding of what your users want. However, please keep in-mind that the features your business chooses to develop must also fit the long-term vision for your product. If you stay short-sighted for too long (i.e. fulfill immediate needs of your customers), you may fall into a habit of being reactive as opposed to proactive in developing new and innovative feature sets.

One method that I like to use is taking a holistic view of each feature that would be under consideration for development and figure out its net business value ROI, where [Return = (measured) Business Value] and [Investment = Development Time spent (on a given feature)]:

Step 1. Approximate how long it would take to develop/integrate each feature into your product.

Step 2. Measure the Business Value that each feature would add. Business Value could be things like increase user retention, increase monetization, increase viral or other distribution, increase engagement or any other metric that you find adds value to your business. You may need to approximate a business value here. Choose a scale that works for your metrics and try to stick to it.

Step 3. Work our your ROI = (Business Value / Development Time) for each feature. You will begin to see which features are going to be big payoffs in the long-run.

Most recently, I have been using SCRUM processes to manage products. Do you use SCRUM? If so, what tweaks have you made to the SCRUM process that you’ve found improved teamwork, decreased iteration time and led to better product-wide planning?

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